255 W. Uwchlan Avenue 
Downingtown, PA 19335 
610-269-4500
Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Yelp Instagram

We’re Here Today For Your Tomorrows

Auto Insurance AUTO Read More
Homeowners Insurance HOME Read More
Business Insurance BUSINESS Read More
Life Insurance LIFE Read More
Health Insurance HEALTH & EMPLOYEE BENEFITS Read More
Motorcycle Insurance MOTORCYCLE Read More

deer runs across road

Watching deer in their natural habitat can be an enjoyable, peaceful experience. But encountering one on a roadway? That’s a different story. 

If it’s happened to you… you’re not alone. More than 1.5 million drivers are involved in deer collisions each year, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, causing nearly $1 billion in vehicle damage. (Learn how auto insurance can help you if you hit a deer.) 

We’ve already shared tips on how to  avoid hitting a deer if one jumps in front of your car. But what about those common bits of folklore that everyone seems to have heard about deer collisions? Is there any truth to those? 

Below are six common myths you may have heard… along with some facts to back them up. 

  • Myth: Deer are more active at sunrise and sunset.
    Status: True. While deer can—and do—cross the road at all hours of the day, dusk and dawn are their peak hours of activity. Deer are “crepuscular” animals. That’s a fancy way of saying they move the most during twilight. So if you’re driving as the sun is rising or coming home from work at dusk… be especially careful.
     
  • Myth: You’re more likely to hit a deer in the fall. 
    Status: True. Nearly half of all deer/vehicle collisions happen between October and December. Not coincidentally, deer mating season and peak hunting days also fall between these months. As deer are running from hunters or looking for a mate… odds are they’ll cross a road somewhere in between.
     

    Related: Top 4 Fall Driving Hazards (And How to Handle Them)

  • Myth: Deer whistles can prevent collisions.
    Status: False. Deer whistles attach to your vehicle and are said to emit a frequency that alerts deer of your presence and send them running away. Despite anecdotal evidence – we all probably know someone who swears by their deer whistle! – no credible study has proven them to be effective. One research study at the University of Georgia found that no matter how loud or high-pitched the whistle, the sound isn’t enough to alter the deer’s behavior. 

    Tried-and-tested technology like crash avoidance features might give you more (or… less?) bang for your buck.
     
  • Myth: Hitting a deer isn’t that dangerous.
    Status: False.  Nobody wants to face the repair costs of a deer collision. But in many instances, these crashes cause more than just inconvenience. In 2016, the IIHS recorded 189 deaths from collisions with animals. It’s important to note that the most serious injuries occur when a vehicle leaves the roadway—so know when to swerve, and when to stay in your lane

    Related: When is a car considered totaled… and what happens when it is?
     

  • Myth: More deer are present at “deer crossing” signs.
    Status: True. If you encounter a deer crossing sign, it’s there for a reason.  Signs are installed in areas with high deer populations and a history of deer collisions. Additional factors that can lead to crashes, such as road conditions and visibility, also inform where deer crossing signs are placed. (And before anyone asks: The signs, of course, are for people to read… not the deer.)

  • Myth: If I hit a deer, I can take home the meat.
    Status: It depends. If you have a taste for venison, you may be tempted to make the best of an unfortunate situation by taking the unlucky animal home with you. But first, check with the authorities – it’s usually the body that regulates hunting in your state, such as the Game Commission or the Fish and Wildlife Division. (Here’s a helpful list, organized by state.) In some states you’re free to take the animal, but not before filing a police report or applying for a special permit or tag. In other states, it’s downright illegal. 

DOES MY AUTO INSURANCE COVER HITTING A DEER?

Deer-vehicle collisions are covered under the comprehensive portion of your auto insurance, which is an optional coverage you can choose to add on. (Learn more about understanding your auto policy.)

An insurance professional like a local Miller's Insurance agent can help you customize an auto insurance package that fits your needs and budget. Find a local agent in your neighborhood or get a free online quote.

This article was brought to you by our friends at Erie Insurance. Miller's would like to extend its gratitude to Erie Insurance for both being a wonderful business ally and for letting us use the articles found on their blog, Eriesense.

Posted 9:00 AM

Share |


No Comments


Post a Comment
Name
Required
E-Mail
Required (Not Displayed)
Comment
Required


All comments are moderated and stripped of HTML.
Submission Validation
Required
CAPTCHA
Change the CAPTCHA codeSpeak the CAPTCHA code
 
Enter the Validation Code from above.
NOTICE: This blog and website are made available by the publisher for educational and informational purposes only. It is not be used as a substitute for competent insurance, legal, or tax advice from a licensed professional in your state. By using this blog site you understand that there is no broker client relationship between you and the blog and website publisher.
Blog Archive
  • 2019
  • 2018
  • 2017
  • 2016
  • 2015
  • 2014


View Mobile Version
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Instagram
Erie Insurance
Westfield
Grange
Progressive
Eastern Alliance Insurance Group
Lackawanna Insurance Group
Independence
© Copyright. All rights reserved.
Powered by Insurance Website Builder
Reach out and refer someone to us so we can give back to the community!
Every referral we receive, $5 will be donated to our Spotlight Charity of the quarter!